© Tim Riggs

Tim Riggs explains why gardeners need to protect pollinating insects, and suggests how.

One of the dreamy delights of a garden is  the sound of buzzing insects as they move from flower to flower, gorging on nectar and transferring or collecting pollen. If we like to save our own seed, or wish to encourage self-seeding, these pollinators are welcome agents of fertilisation, and of course they pollinate our apples, pears, plums and raspberries, but whether we benefit directly or not, we can enjoy their presence. A garden devoid of bees, hoverflies and butterflies is unthinkable.

Read more: Is your garden buzzing?

There are numerous good sites offering sound advice about how to source your first bees.

The bbka offer advice.

This is simple sound advice and can be expanded on by further reading.

You can ask other bee keepers, but remember the old adage if you ask three experienced beekeepers the same question you will get at least 5 answers.

Read more: Obtaining Your First Bees And Starting Beekeeping

An open broodbox

On average this is a weekly task during the bee season and starts when the weather warms sufficiently to open the hives. Rule of thumb: if it is comfortable outside in shirt sleeves, it is ok to open a hive.

There are those who will bother their bees a great deal less. Personally I would like to check them loads more, but that would be for my personal satisfaction and would be very disruptive to the colony.

Read more: How To : Hive Examination

Subcategories

Training Courses

Modules  & Study Groups

Page 2 of 2

BeeBase

Beebase News Web feed
  • This week (13-19 July) is Bees’ Needs Week
    10 July 2020
    Bees’ Needs Week is a campaign co-ordinated by Defra to raise awareness of the importance of bees and other pollinators, and to provide practical advice on what we can all do to support them. Many organisations are working together to encourage everyone who can, to do simple things at home - like growing more flowers and cutting grass less often - to help our precious pollinators thrive, and to engage further with nature through citizen science initiatives.
    There’s more information on the Bees’ Needs Website. Throughout the week a variety of content will be shared online including:
    • Why bees are important animation
    • Day in the life of a beekeeper video
    • Educational resources including bumble bee identification
    • Information on the UK Pollinator Monitoring Scheme
    Get involved with Bees’ Needs Week on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook using #BeesNeeds
  • New Presentations Online
    11 June 2020
    The National Bee Unit is pleased to share a range of presentations created by Fera Science Ltd. presented by Kirsty Stainton on;
    Asian Hornet Biology
    Asian Hornet Genetics
    European foulbrood

    The presentations can be found on BeeBases pages on Asian hornet and Foulbrood.
    Please do contact us with your feedback.
  • DIAGNOSTIC SERVICES PROVIDED BY SASA DURING COVID-19 CRISIS
    09 April 2020
    Scottish beekeepers; please read the attached information note from Scottish Government.

    DIAGNOSTIC SERVICES PROVIDED BY SASA DURING COVID-19 CRISIS