If you are academically inclined you may want to consider studying for the 7 Modular exams.

  • Module 1 - Honey bee Management
  • Module 2 - Honey bee Products and Forage
  • Module 3 - Honey bee Pests, Diseases and Poisoning
  • Module 4 - Not currently Active
  • Module 5 - Honey bee Biology
  • Module 6 - Honey Bee Behaviour
  • Module 7 Selection & Breeding of Honey bees
  • Module 8 - Honey bee Management, Health and History

If you undertake Modules 1,2, 3 and one other, you are given an ‘Intermediate Theory Certificate’ and when you have completed all 7 you qualify for the ‘Advanced Theory Certificate’.

These modules cover all aspects of beekeeping from the management of colonies, bee biology and behaviour and disease through to more specialized aspects like queen rearing and breeding which are covered in some depth.

In order to undertake the modular study you will have to have successfully completed the Basic Assessment. Details of how to undertake this can be found under ‘Training’ on this website.

Exams take place in mid March and November every year and applications and fees need to be sent to the local Warwickshire Exam Secretary, or the BBKA head office at Stoneleigh at least 6 weeks before the exam date ie at the beginning of February and October.

Details of the syllabus and reading lists can be found on the BBKA website.

Forming a Study Group to work together on a module can be helpful as a way of sharing and discussing difficulties and exploring things you are unsure of. In Rugby we have used the distance learning correspondence courses provided by BBKA as the basis for structuring the study group, but you can use this form of study on your own. If you form a study group Warwickshire will refund half the cost of the correspondence course. The correspondence course will supplement your modular study but does not cover all aspects of the syllabus.


BeeBase

Beebase News Web feed
  • This week (13-19 July) is Bees’ Needs Week
    10 July 2020
    Bees’ Needs Week is a campaign co-ordinated by Defra to raise awareness of the importance of bees and other pollinators, and to provide practical advice on what we can all do to support them. Many organisations are working together to encourage everyone who can, to do simple things at home - like growing more flowers and cutting grass less often - to help our precious pollinators thrive, and to engage further with nature through citizen science initiatives.
    There’s more information on the Bees’ Needs Website. Throughout the week a variety of content will be shared online including:
    • Why bees are important animation
    • Day in the life of a beekeeper video
    • Educational resources including bumble bee identification
    • Information on the UK Pollinator Monitoring Scheme
    Get involved with Bees’ Needs Week on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook using #BeesNeeds
  • New Presentations Online
    11 June 2020
    The National Bee Unit is pleased to share a range of presentations created by Fera Science Ltd. presented by Kirsty Stainton on;
    Asian Hornet Biology
    Asian Hornet Genetics
    European foulbrood

    The presentations can be found on BeeBases pages on Asian hornet and Foulbrood.
    Please do contact us with your feedback.
  • DIAGNOSTIC SERVICES PROVIDED BY SASA DURING COVID-19 CRISIS
    09 April 2020
    Scottish beekeepers; please read the attached information note from Scottish Government.

    DIAGNOSTIC SERVICES PROVIDED BY SASA DURING COVID-19 CRISIS